Aldi Slip and Fall Injury

Aldi is one of the leading discount supermarket stores in Texas and the United States.  Aldi has over one hundred locations in Texas.  Aldi’s stores have a smaller footprint because it relies heavily on store brands.  Even though Aldi is a smaller grocery store than most standard grocery stores, many of the same slip and fall hazards may still exist in the store. 

A slip and fall can cause permanent life altering injuries to a customer.  If an employee of Aldi ignores a dangerous condition and fails to clean up a slippery substance in his presence, the store may be held responsible for a customer’s injuries.  Contact a slip and fall attorney as soon as possible if you are injured in a grocery store.  The O’Hara Law Firm has brought claims against grocery stores such as HEB, Kroger and Walmart on behalf of customers who fell and were injured.  Contact us at (832) 956-1138.

Slip and Fall Injuries

 

Most grocery stores such as Aldi have hard concrete or tile floors.  These floors are unforgiving when someone falls on them.  Common injuries from slip and falls include:

  • Broken bones;
  • Spinal cord injuries;
  • Disc herniations;
  • Concussions;
  • Hyperextended knees and elbows;
  • Hip fractures; and
  • Shoulder injuries.

The most common cause of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a fall.  Falls cause forty percent of all TBIs that require hospitalization or cause death.  The youngest and oldest members of society disproportionately fall and receive these types of injuries.  A serious TBI may cause seizures, constant pain, difficulty walking, blindness, cognitive impairment and depression.

Common Dangerous Conditions

 

There are several common dangerous situations that may arise in a grocery store.  They include the following:

1. Liquid and food spills

Aldi contains lots of products that when dropped or spilled on the floor may create a slip and fall hazard.  Detergents, soaps, and cooking oils are extremely slippery.  They are also usually clear and not readily visible to someone walking near them.  A store will not be responsible for a customer causing the spill unless an employee failed to clean it up after he saw it or should have seen it. If a slippery substance is on the floor for a substantial period of time, a jury will likely find that the employee should have seen the hazard.

2. Wet floors from rain

During a rain storm, patrons may bring in water from outside.  A store should place a prominent wet floor warning sign near the entrance to warn customers that the floor is wet. 

3. Pallets on the floor

Stores routinely receive merchandise on pallets.  Employees then typically move the pallets to the aisle where the merchandise is sold to replenish the shelves.  As the merchandise is unloaded, the pallet becomes less visible to those walking in the aisle.  The O’Hara law firm has represented several different clients who tripped over empty pallets in stores.  All the clients required surgery on their upper limbs as a result of the fall.

4. Parking lot hazards

Potholes, uneven surfaces and gaping cracks are tripping hazards.  If the grocery store does not own the property, the landlord may be responsible for the fall in the parking lot. 

What if I am injured at Aldi?

 

If you are injured at an Aldi store, notify a manager immediately of the injury.  If a witness saw the fall, ask for his or her name and contact information.  The manager or store employee making a report may neglect to record contact information for the witnesses.  If you are able, take pictures of the dangerous condition that caused your injury.  Then, seek medical attention for your injury. 

Contact a Houston slip and fall attorney as soon as possible after you receive your initial medical treatment.  A slip and fall attorney will help preserve any surveillance video that the store may have of the scene of the injury.  An attorney with experience handling premise liability claims will help clients maximize their recovery.  Without an attorney, the store will likely offer an injured customer a small amount of money or nothing at all. 

Posted in Premise Liability

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